Meet our New Faculty

Thanks to a significant faculty expansion in the Division of the Social Sciences, CIR’s roster of researchers, teachers, and advisors has recently grown by more than 25 percent.  Their research interests range broadly, including international trade, the uses of secrecy in war, gender and globalization in Southeast Asia, demography and religion in Africa, paramilitary movements in the United States, and post-colonial international political thought.  Find out more about our new faculty below:


AUSTIN CARSON, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

Austin Carson is a political scientist whose research focus is the politics of secrecy and publicity in international relations. His book project, Facing Off and Saving Face, analyzes the logic of secrecy in external military interventions, showing how states shift to covert forms of intervention to control conflict escalation dynamics. Other research projects explore related themes including the signaling value of covert action, the damage to norm health from publicizing deviance in the international system, new views on secrecy from the sociology of Erving Goffman, and theories of limited war. Carson received his PhD from Ohio State.

  • Research Foci: International Relations (how nations use secrecy to mask efforts to influence wars)

CHIARA CORDELLI, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

Chiara Cordelli’s main area of research is contemporary analytical political theory. Her research interests include the relationship between the distributive and relational dimensions of equality; the moral and institutional division of labor between state and civil society in theories of justice; the public/ private distinction in liberal theory; the nature of duties of beneficence and the ethics of philanthropy; and the ethical limits of privatization. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Political Philosophy, Political Studies, British Journal of Political Science, Critical Review of Social and Political Philosophy, and Political Studies Review. She co-edited Philanthropy in Democratic Societies, forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press. Cordelli earned her PhD from University College London in 2011.

  • Research Foci: Political Theory (fairness and ‘relationship capital’ in distributive justice)

ADOM GETACHEW, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

Adom Getachew is the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Political Science and the College. Her research interests are situated in the history of political thought, with specialized interests in international law, theories of empire and race, black political thought and post-colonial political theory. Getachew’s current project, “The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination,” excavates and reconstructs an account of self-determination offered in the political thought of Nnamdi Azikiwe, W.E.B Du Bois, Kwame Nkrumah, Eric Williams, Julius Nyerere and Michael Manley during the height of decolonization in the twentieth century. Drawing on archival research in Barbados, Ghana, Switzerland, Trinidad and the United Kingdom, the project illustrates how these anti-colonial critics, intellectuals and statesmen reinvented the concept of self-determination as a project of world-making in which they reconceived international political and economic relations. Getachew was most recently Provost Career Enhancement Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago during the 2015-2016 year. Getachew holds a joint PhD in Political Science and African-American Studies from Yale University.

  • Research Foci: History of Political Thought (specialized interests in international law, theories of empire and race, black political thought and post-colonial political theory)

ROBERT GULOTTY, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

Robert Gulotty’s first book project is Governing Trade Beyond Tariffs: The Politics of Multinational Production and Its Implications for International Cooperation. He is also engaged in research on the origins of the international trade regime and the effects of domestic institutions on foreign economic policymaking. This research includes a book project, Opening of the American Market: Rules, Norms and Coalitions, with Judith Goldstein. Gulotty’s work appears in International Organization, The Oxford Handbook of Historical Institutionalism, and The World Trade Report. Gulotty earned his PhD from Stanford University in 2014.

  • Research Foci: International Relations, International Political Economy, Political Methodology

KIMBERLY HOANG, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

Kimberly Kay Hoang’s research interests center on sociology of gender, globalization, economic sociology, and qualitative methods. A central focus of her work is to understand the gendered dynamics of deal brokering in Southeast Asia’s emerging markets. In 2015, she published the monograph Dealing in Desire: Asian Ascendancy, Western Decline, and the Hidden Currencies of Global Sex Work that examines the mutual construction of masculinities, financial deal-making, and transnational political-economic identities. She is currently conducting research for her second book project, which involves a comparative study of the articulation of inter-Asian flows of capital and foreign investment in Southeast Asia. Hoang received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 2012.

  • Research Foci: Gender and Economic Development (relationship-building across different economic cultures in Southeast Asia)

DARRYL LI, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY

Operating at the intersection of law and anthropology, Darryl Li’s research addresses vital contemporary issues. His current research looks at law, violence, and Islam. In his first book, under contract with Stanford University Press, Li focuses on transnational jihad movements in the international legal order. He is also at work on a project funded by the Social Science Research Council on migrant labor in private military industries. Before joining The University of Chicago, Li earned a JD from Yale Law School, where he later served as an Associate Research Scholar in Law and a Robina Visiting Human Rights Fellow, and PhD from Harvard. In addition to his academic work, Li has written amicus briefs, served as an expert witness in human rights cases, and written for major media publications.

  • Research Foci: War Studies, International Law/Legal Anthropology, Migrant Labor in Private Military Industries; South Asia, Middle East


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MONIKA NALEPA, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

Monika Nalepa (PhD, Columbia University) is associate professor of political science at the University of Chicago. With a focus on post-communist Europe, her research interests include transitional justice, parties and legislatures, and game-theoretic approaches to comparative politics. Her first book, Skeletons in the Closet: Transitional Justice in Post-Communist Europe was published in the Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics Series and received the Best Book award from the Comparative Democratization section of the APSA and the Leon Epstein Outstanding Book Award from the Political Organizations and Parties section of the APSA. She has published her research in the Journal of Comparative PoliticsWorld PoliticsJournal of Conflict ResolutionJournal of Theoretical Politics, and Decyzje. Her next book manuscript, Parties Ascendant, examines the development of programmatic parties in new democracies with a special focus on legislative institutions. 

Research Foci: Post-Communist Europe, Transitional Justice, Parties and Legislatures, and Game-Theoretic Approaches To Comparative Politics 


 

PAUL POAST, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

Paul Poast’s research on international relations and quantitative methodology has been funded by the National Science Foundation and has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, International Organization, World Politics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, and Political Analysis, among others. Paul received his PhD from the University of Michigan, where his dissertation won the Peace Science Society’s Walter Isard Award.

  • Research Foci: International Relations (international alliance formation, the role of international organizations in assisting transitions to democracy)


JENNY TRINITAPOLI, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

Jenny Trinitapoli’s training and background focuses on social demography and the sociology of religion. Bridging these two fields, her work features the demographer’s characteristic concern with data and denominators and an insistence on connecting demographic processes to questions of meaning. Trinitapoli has written extensively on the role of religion in the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa; religion permeates her research, even when it isn’t present as a variable. Since 2008, she has been the PI of Tsogolo la Thanzi (TLT), an ongoing longitudinal study of young adults in Malawi. Trinitapoli earned her PhD from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007.

  • Research Foci: Demography and Religious Studies (social role of religious belief and practice in Malawi with focus on how beliefs and organized communities of worship shape both disease-related outcomes (AIDS) and reproductive behavior)