From the Desk of Mark Bradley...

The Committee on International Relations at the University of Chicago, the nation's oldest graduate program in international affairs, combines intellectual diversity and analytical rigor to provide an especially stimulating environment for students.

The small size and scholarly intensity of the Committee ensure that students with differing perspectives will challenge each other and come to a more sophisticated understanding of the complicated interaction between the realities of international politics and the requirements of a global morality. The sharp analytical and critical skills the program fosters provide excellent preparation for students, whether they choose to continue their graduate studies in leading doctoral programs, or decide to work in government or the private sector.

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Students work closely with Chicago's distinguished faculty in international relations. At the core of the Committee's curriculum is the preparation of a faculty advised thesis that explores a significant problem in international affairs. Another feature of the program are two required core seminars in international relations and international political economy that introduce state of the art scholarship in international affairs. Students also choose from a wide array of courses, often taught in small seminar-style settings, by faculty from throughout the university in international relations, political economy, development, law, human rights and regional studies.

Outside the formal classroom setting, students are encouraged to participate in one or more of the University's more than seventy interdisciplinary workshops where they can engage work-in-progress by faculty and peers in their area of research.

If the unique intellectual environmental that distinguishes the University of Chicago is attractive to you, I invite you to explore the possibilities the Committee on International Relations has to offer.

Mark Bradley
Chair, Committee on International Relations and Bernadotte E. Schmitt Professor of International History